Wizard of Oz Article

The Wizard of Ounces (1939) uses both mise en scène and sound to create a great immense collection of desire imagery, particularly in the second to last scene exactly where Dorothy are at the point of going back to Kansas. This scene is distinctly significant in terms of mise en scène and appear as it proves the film and illustrates the topics that have been revealed throughout, giving a clearer meaning to the film's audience. The mise en scène can be used to describe what the body and how come it is generally there. The scene near the end of the film where Dorothy is saying goodbye to the dream characters prior to leaving to visit home in a hot air balloon is specially significant with regards to mise en scène. The setting consists of bright shades in the Terrain of Ounce which distinction against the boring colours found in the following sequence when Dorothy arrives back home. The accommodement of the different colours describes the differences among reality and fantasy. The director is intending to show that although actuality may seem uninteresting, ‘there is no place like home, ' therefore it is purpose plays a part in the viewers' understanding. The Wizard of Oz is well known for its selection of tonalities. The director contrasts both the grayscale white choco effect with the use of the three strip Technicolor process in order to display that the dream world is somewhat more appealing than the real world. The uses excessive exposure and high colour contrast once Dorothy actions into the Terrain of Ounce, which clashes against the boring black and white-colored effect of the first series at the farm. The colours stand out a lot more than before, which will creates a much sharper and brighter picture. The grayscale white effect is repeated again inside the very previous scene when Dorothy can be home, showcasing the difference again. David Bordwell suggests that visitors judge the mise en scène of any film by simply standards of realism. (Bordwell, 2008, g. 113) The setting of Oz is constructed being a magical dream land, and for that reason audiences will never expect an authentic...



Wilsonian Progressivism at Home and Abroad Composition

Related

Category

News